Award-Winning Native American Music Group Coming to Charlottesville

Culture & Identity | Virginia Indians

Brulé in concert. Additional and high-resolution photos available upon request.
Brulé in concert. Additional and high-resolution photos available upon request.

Virginia Foundation for the Humanities (VFH) is delighted to present Brulé, the nationally known, award-winning Native American rock/cultural music group, for its only announced public appearance on the east coast during its 2015-2016 national tour.

Brulé in concert. Additional and high-resolution photos available upon request.
Brulé in concert. Additional and high-resolution photos available upon request.

Brulé will conduct a Workshop Stage talk and performance on Friday, September 11, at 7:00 p.m. at Tandem Friends School in Charlottesville and a full performance on Saturday, September 12, at 8:00 p.m. at The Paramount Theater in downtown Charlottesville. The Workshop Stage event at Tandem will be free of charge, and tickets to The Paramount performance are $12 in advance, $15 at the door, available at The Paramount box office. Both events are open to the public.

Tickets »

Hailing from South Dakota, Brulé thrills audiences with a fusion of cultural rock, traditional sound, and theatrical dance. Now in their 20th season, their performances carry the same contagious excitement as Trans-Siberian Orchestra, Celtic Thunder, and Riverdance. Brulé’s electrifying show includes a five-piece rock ensemble with traditional Native American instrumentation, paired with one of the top U.S. Native American dance troupes. The musical journey of Brulé’s founder, Paul LaRoche, adds an important message about cultural reconciliation and healing. The result is Native America meets Pink Floyd in a spectacular stage production of sight, sound, and soul.

We’re hoping people will take away a new appreciation of the power of music to cross cultures and bring healing to our world. – Karenne Wood

“This is one of those transformative experiences demonstrating that Native people are still here, a vibrant part of the American present as well as the past, with insights to share about our connections to others, to the land, and to other living things around us,” said Karenne Wood (Monacan), director of Virginia Indian Programs at VFH. “We’re hoping people will take away a new appreciation of the power of music to cross cultures and bring healing to our world.”

To learn more about the Virginia Indian Program, visit virginiaindianprogram.org.

Sponsors

VFH thanks the following media sponsors for this event:

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About VFH

The mission of Virginia Foundation for the Humanities is to connect people and ideas to explore the
human experience and inspire cultural engagement. VFH reaches an estimated annual audience of 23 million through Community Programs, Digital Initiatives, Scholarship, and the Virginia Center for the Book.